♥ Coffee Jelly // コーヒーゼリー ♥

It’s June, it’s June! It’s almost summer!

There’s nothing particularly important about June 2nd, 2011, other than the fact that I was watching the Canucks just a few hours ago.

Scoring with 18.5 seconds left in the 3rd to beat the Bruins? Beauty!

On June 2nd last year, though, I was still in the middle of my wild gallivant around Japan, stuffing myself with parfaits and honey lattes, walking 10km or more per day, soaking in hot springs, hopping the bullet train, and taking photos at temples.

I met some awesome new people, in particular my Tokyo-livin’ friend, Sumie, as well as other backpackers.

Traveling around Japan was definitely one of the best experiences of my life, so this entire month I’ll be paying homage to one of my favourite places in the world and its unique dessert culture.

But when trying new things it’s definitely best to start out with the familiar — thus, I present you with a cup of coffee.

Coffee jelly, that is.

This isn’t your all-American J-E-L-L-O — coffee jelly is a grown-up dessert that’s only lightly sweetened and often served with a side of cream that you drizzle over top.

Any respectable coffee-lover has to try it at least once, even if you do live on this side of the ocean.

Coffee Jelly • コーヒーゼリー

*recipe by Christine

Ingredients

  • 1 package powdered gelatin
  • 3 tablespoons cold water
  • 1 cup strong coffee
  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 2 tablespoons white sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • whipped cream or half & half, to garnish

Directions

In a heatproof bowl, sprinkle 1 packet of powdered gelatin over 3 tablespoons cold water. Let sit for 5 ~ 10 minutes.

Freshly brew your coffee.

When the gelatin has soaked long enough, pour the hot coffee into the heatproof bowl, whisking constantly.

Whisk until all the gelatin has dissolved, then whisk in the water, white sugar, and vanilla. Stir until the sugar has dissolved.

Divide the liquid between heat resistant glasses or mugs. Place the cups in the fridge to chill until the jelly is firm, at least 2 hours.

Once the jelly is set, top with whipped cream or half & half and serve chilled.

This recipe is simple, straight forward, and great to make ahead.

In Japan, the jelly is eaten cold and can either be served a one solid helping or diced and served in a pile that’s drenched in half & half.

Try it both ways, since it’s the perfect treat to beat the heat. Yum!

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7 thoughts on “♥ Coffee Jelly // コーヒーゼリー ♥

  1. Joanne says:

    that sounds interesting and easy to make. As usual the photo is great, love the background.

  2. This sounds delicious! I’ll have to try it soon. Your photos are great by the way, I hope to photograph Japan someday too 🙂

  3. Wow, this is such a cool dessert idea! The Japanese come up with some crazy ideas. I like it though. You know what would be even better though? Adding liquor to it!

  4. Eftychia says:

    Summer is here and this is perfect for this time of the year!! Thanks for sharing!

  5. Christine says:

    thanks for this recipe! I miss coffee jelly so much since leaving Japan! definitely one of my faves for a hot day walkin through osaka streets! ❤

  6. OL says:

    Hi, Just wondering how many grams is in one packet of gelatin? Thanks! By the way, your blog is great! makes me wanna start baking!

    • Christine says:

      I did some searching online and the answer I’ve come up with is 7 grams! Not all gelatin has the same “bloom value” (which measures its ability to set) though — I used 1 envelope of Knox brand gelatin… hope that helps!

      I’m glad you’re enjoying my blog and recipes. 🙂

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